New Year’s Brings Sales Tax Filing Changes

Happy New Year’s! We hope you had a wonderful New Year’s Eve celebrating with friends and family. While most people are off from work today, tomorrow starts a new calendar year in business and with each new year there are a number of changes in sales tax that go into effect on January 1. Many changes in sales tax aren’t much to worry about if you’re using an automated system that automatically changes sales tax rates. If you’re not automating your sales tax yet, now is the time — so you don’t have to worry about all the rate changes that go into effect today. Some of the biggest changes in sales tax are about exemptions, like North Carolina’s exemption for prepared food sold to college students on college campuses or Illinois’ simplification of telecommunication exemptions. However, a number of states are also changing filing requirements.

In Connecticut businesses will now need to file their sales tax returns  electronically or suffer penalties. In North Dakota, it’s the same case for retailers who now must electronically file. In Wisconsin, however, it’s about frequency. We expect other filing changes to be addressed in state legislatures in 2014 so if you’re not ready for increased filing frequency and online filing, you’re business is going to be quickly behind the times if it isn’t already. How can you get ready? By choosing a sales tax filing solution that makes it quick and easy to file sales tax. Most of our customers files sales tax in an hour or less. With electronic filing built right into our FileLINK software, it’s easy to finish your sales tax tasks in no time and move on to more important tasks. If you’d like to find out more, be sure to watch our video below explaining our sales tax software and sign up for a free demo to start the new year off right.

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